How To Deal With Trauma According To 2016 San Antonio Combat PTSD Conference

Attending the 2016 San Antonio Combat PTSD Conference was quite challenging. It was not because I suffered from the disorder at the time, but because my uncle who’s a retired soldier refused to go with me. His reasons – a.k.a. alibis – ranged from him being busy to the event having no use for him. If there’s something I figured out after years of working with other PTSD patients, though, it’s the fact that the condition could be avoided if one learns how to deal with traumatic experiences early.

Thus, whether you know that you live with PTSD or not, below are the most practical ways to prevent trauma from worsening.

1. Welcome Distressing Thoughts When They Come

The first thing you should do is allow the troubling thoughts to play in your head. Trying to fight them or not accepting them can merely increase your sadness and anger. You ought to welcome such feelings – no matter how painful they may be – so that the negativity won’t build up in your heart and mind.

2. Open Up About The Traumatic Experience(s)

It is wise to talk to your loved ones about the trauma as well. You tend to feel as if the distressful thoughts are getting flushed out of your system when you open up about it to others, frankly speaking. While the traumatic experience may not stop affecting you in one go, its effect may reduce the more you talk about your past ordeals.

3. Look For A Silver Lining

Lastly, remember that there is a silver lining in every situation. It may not be easy to find that if negative emotions reign inside you, but you have to try looking for it anyway. That will make you feel not too sorry for yourself since you got something good out of it in the end.

To Sum Things Up

You won’t need to combat PTSD once you manage to prevent trauma from developing into something worse. Follow the tips given above to be able to deal with traumatic experiences now. Good luck!…

Tips For Managing PTSD In The Family

Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a big problem for many. It becomes a hindrance to your everyday activities. It affects your personal development and in some cases your relationships. In the family, you may have had a father who was a soldier in the past or a brother who may have suffered a traumatic car accident. It pains to see your loved one have PTSD, but it is manageable. Here are five ways to help you hold PTSD in the family.…